“Taking yourself too seriously will come in the way of your creativity”

Your artwork is very impressive and distinctive. Where did your love for drawing start and why did you choose Communication Design as your specialization?

Thank you! I think I was one of those kids that used to draw on every surface possible-walls, tables, notebooks. Biology diagrams were my favourite! I’ve always found it easiest to explain things through drawing, and my dad being quite involved in art made it more natural for me.
Taking up communication design was a happy accident. I had intended to study zoology, but changed my mind at the last moment (I’m not entirely sure why), and here I am!

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

Who or what motivates you to generate new ideas and concepts?

Most of my work is kind of a journal of what I am doing at that moment, like people I am with, an activity I am currently obsessed with and travel experiences. I like to get my inspiration from real life things that make me happy. It’s evident in the repetitive themes I have running through my work from different times in my life. You’ll probably see a lot of slacklining in my work right now, because that’s what I am into currently.

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

Which has been your most memorable piece of work that you have created? Can you give us a brief description about it and the tools that you used for the same?

I recently did a series of illustrations inspired by the artist Mark Rothko. I had seen his work in Copenhagen and Houston, and he’s such a groundbreaking artist, that I was literally fangirling. This series is part inspiration and part tribute to his theory of color-field painting. Rothko painted with natural pigments, and his simplistic blocks of color are very deceptive of the depth of emotion and technique they hold. I don’t know if it was politically correct, but I’m such a fan! (I promise I didn’t just Google all this to sound cool)

Each illustration has a different significance, but my favourite is the one with the red balloon. It’s a self portrait representing my constant state of wonder, and it’s interesting because I had to study my own face anatomy from an angle I’ve never used before. I’ve used Photoshop to digitally paint these illustrations.

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

What were the challenges did you face while working on such projects?

The biggest woe of every designer is the client brief (admit it, we’ve all felt this way). What’s different about my work is that I don’t ever have a brief, and I’m just trying to express through visuals what I find impossible to put well in words. It’s difficult to translate words to visuals with 100% accuracy. With my work, I try to bridge art with design, and getting that perfect balance between the two is what I work hard to achieve.

rothko 2

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

What are the tools/software that you use regularly as a part of your work? Did you undergo training for the same?

I use a lot of Adobe softwares like Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and Premiere. I’m taught most of these softwares as part of my design education in college. Yet, paper and pencil trump all!

What does the industry demand in terms of technical / soft skills from a fresher artist?

I don’t think it is a very high-pressure kind of situation. Basic skills, unending curiosity and being quick to learn whatever is thrown your way are all you’ll need. The rest you’ll learn on the job!

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

Pic Courtesy : HImanshi Parmar

What message do you have in mind for the aspiring artists?

It’s become quite a trend nowadays to be called an ‘illustrator’ or a ‘storyteller’. What happens when you give yourself titles like this is you kind of stop being a student. Not just of what you’re studying, but of everything the world can teach if you know how to listen. I don’t mean to sound preachy, and I definitely haven’t reached the top myself yet, but taking yourself too seriously will come in the way of your creativity. It’s so much easier to be a student than a professional! You’ll have the scope to explore outside of the boundaries these titles will put on you. And thats how you’ll do your best work- focus on honing your skills, don’t be in a hurry to get ahead, and most importantly never stop learning and having fun!

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